• Woody

Food Colouring Comparison BLOG

Updated: Feb 15

Ever since I started Cake Decorating, I have used Sugarflair Food Colourings. I don’t really know why this is, but it’s probably just because it’s the first brand I saw! However, since then I have always wanted, like many other bakers, to know which food colouring truly is best.


The lovely people over at Cake Craft World, have generously sent me a range of different food colourings to try. They have sent me Wilton, Progel, Colour Splash and Sugarflair.



As you know, Sugarflair is my current choice of food colouring brand. I enjoy the concentration of Sugarflair colourings and their wide range of colours. However, I’ve always wished they were packaged in tubes similar to Progel and Colour Splash, to make them easier to use.


Wilton is an American Brand, which is often said to have bad food colourings. The Wilton they’ve sent me is in a tub so I expect it will be a paste, which is new because the last Wilton I tried was a liquid, which was terrible. Unfortunately, this one also comes in a small pot as opposed to a tube.

Next we have Progel and Colour Splash. I have always wanted to try these two, due to the apparent great results. I don’t really know anything about these brands, however they are both very popular. In the past, I have used metallic Colour Splash powders which produce a great, intense colour, so hopefully these will too. Both of these are packaged in tubes.


I’m going to test each of the colours Cake Craft World sent me up against a matching Sugarflair, which I already own. Therefore we can ensure the test is fair. I am doing this because a good red or black is extremely difficult to get, when opposed to a lighter colour, due to how deep the colour must be. I feel it would be unfair to test a black against a pastel green, for example.



Let’s start with the GREEN COLOUR SPLASH. Like I said this comes in a tube, and I tested it against the Sugarflair Party Green, which I expect is the closest shade to the one I’m testing. The tube was easy to squeeze and I tried to use the same amount of colouring I would use, if I was using Sugarflair. It coloured the fondant very easily, but created quite a subtle, light green. However, I’m sure that if I was to use a little more colour I would get a deeper shade.



I used a cutlery knife, to add a tiny amount of Sugarflair colouring to the fondant. This also mixed in easily, and far quicker I noticed a far deeper and impactful colour. This shows that although you can get great results with Colour Splash, you have to generally use more colouring, as opposed to Sugarflair



Sugarflair 1 - 0



Next, I used the PROGEL PURPLE, against the Sugarflair Grape/Violet. Once again, the colour was easy to disperse, however I got the end of the tube in more of a mess than the Colour Splash one, due to it having a larger hole. This one actually produced a nice, light purple. Therefore, I beleive that Progel are generally better than Colour Splash.



I tried it against the Sugarflair Grape/Violet, which I felt was a very similar shade, so thought it would be a fair test. Once mixed in, it produced similar results to the Progel, however I do beleive that it did produce a slightly more impactful colour. The purple seemed to have more depth, whereas the Pro Gel was similar to a pastel purple.



Sugarflair 2 - 0



Last to try was the WILTON BLACK. When opening the tub I was shocked to realise that the colouring was actually liquid! Therefore, I nearly got it all over myself when trying to remove the lid. Immediately, this made it harder to colour the fondant. Not only was it hard to transfer to the fondant cleanly, too much colour would’ve had more drastic consequences, due to its liquid state. Once I had started kneading, it was clear that the fondant was stickier, it felt not dissimilar to a bread dough. Obviously, usually I would purchase a black fondant due to the difficulty to get a proper colour, as opposed to a grey. Therefore, I wasn’t expecting it to be overly dark, however I was still unimpressed by the light shade of grey produced.



I tested this against Sugarflair Black Extra. This Sugarflair is a paste, immediately making it easier to handle, and therefore didn’t have too many consequences to the consistency of the fondant. This produced a more charcoal shade of grey, immediately illuminating the heavy concentration of Sugarflair.



Sugarflair 3 - 0



Therefore, it is clear to see the winner. Sugarflair won every test, with only Progel coming close to the intensity of colour.



When purchasing colours in the future, I will definitely purchase more Sugarflair. In addition, I will try to purchase some Progel, when wanting a particular shade or slightly softer colour.


This test is invaluable when unsure which brand to purchase. In conclusion, the only brand I would never buy is Wilton due to the difficulty and lack of concentration.


I hope this blog has come in handy for those of you that are perhaps unsure which brand to purchase, and will refer back to it in the future. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a very extensive test due to there being other brands, like Fractal Colours, and trying out different colours of the each brand. If this is something you would be interested in seeing, please let me know!


I used Sattina Fondant, which was kindly sent to me by Cake Craft World (thank you!!!), with the colours. They are a great company and I wouldn’t hesitate to purchase from their website in the future, which is:

www.cakecraftworld.co.uk


Talk later ✌️




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